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ShortCut: Becoming mundane and Repetition Suppression

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ShortCut: Becoming mundane and Repetition Suppression

Even though there is something new that affects you deeply and alter your perception, it will eventually become less interesting and innovative while you get exposed to it. This may mean a pruning experience of joy and awe to you, but ,actually, it is the leading force of creativity and imagination amid humans. How does something become less excited when we get more familiar with it?

"Over time, even great works that once shocked the population will fall somewhere between the sanctioned and the forgettable. The avant-garde becomes the new normal. The cutting edge becomes less sharp. Why do humans adapt to everything around so quickly? It is because of a phenomenon known as repetition suppression. When your brain gets used to something, it displays less and less of response each time it sees it. Imagine, for example, that you come across a new object – say, a self-driving car. The first time you see it, your brain shows a large response. It is absorbing something new and registering it. The second time you see it, your brain shows slightly less response. It does not care quite as much about it, because it is not quite as novel. The third time: less response again. The fourth time: even less. The more familiar something is, the less neural energy we spend on it(1)."

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Figure - 75.1

References

(1) Eagleman, David & Brandt, Anthony. "To Innovate is Human." The Runaway Species: How Human Creativity Remakes The World. London: Canongate Books, 2017. 17-19. Print.

Figure - 75.1 https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Repetition-suppression-Whole-brain-repetition-suppression-effect-for-A-Robot-B_fig2_51072674